With footballers becoming victims of the increasingly growing social media microscope it is easy to forget that they – like you and me – are human beings and are inevitably prone to mistakes.

MADRID, SPAIN – FEBRUARY 18: Marcos Llorente of Atletico de Madrid competes for the ball with Divock Origi of Liverpool FC during the UEFA Champions League round of 16 first leg match between Atletico Madrid and Liverpool FC at Wanda Metropolitano on February 18, 2020 in Madrid, Spain. (Photo by Mateo Villalba/Quality Sport Images/Getty Images)

When a player has a rare off night it is easy to fixate on a person’s shortcomings and weaknesses whilst overlooking their previous accomplishments so when some supporters turned on Divock Origi it felt that the amount of criticism the Belgian was subject to was completely unwarranted.

Whilst this is only a small minority who were quick to overlook a player who has single-handily inspired some of the club’s greatest ever moments in its 127-year history it is worth reflecting on all the same.

Is it true that Origi failed to impact the tie after replacing Sadio Mane at half-time? Yes. But to completely write off a player whose Anfield story perfectly typifies the Jurgen Klopp mentality model is vastly premature.

Origi may have failed to inject some attacking impetus into a match that had pretty much lost its soul once Saul Niguez converted what would prove to be the winning-goal inside five minutes. However,  none of the 14 Liverpool players who featured in the Spanish capital managed to muster a solitary effort at Jan Oblak’s goal.

 

Also, it is worth reflecting that the Belgium international is one of the most selfless members of the squad. We forget that Origi – who joined the club in 2014 for a fee of £10m [BBC Sport] – is not a traditional winger and sacrifices his own personal game to do a job for his team.

Unfortunately for Origi, similarly to Salah, the striker has become a victim of his own success following his last season antics that saw him take the fast-track route to club-icon status.

After coming off the bench to score a dramatic last-gasp winner against Everton in the Merseyside derby in December 2018 he quickly secured club-legend status with more crucial contributions.

Another late winner at Newcastle was followed by a clinical double in the stunning Champions League semi-final fightback against Barcelona.

He then sealed Liverpool’s sixth European Cup triumph confirming his rank as a club immortal with an emphatic finish in the final against Tottenham in Madrid.

MADRID, SPAIN – FEBRUARY 18: Divock Origi of Liverpool FC controls the ball during the UEFA Champions League round of 16 first leg match between Atletico Madrid and Liverpool FC at Wanda Metropolitano on February 18, 2020 in Madrid, Spain. (Photo by Diego Souto/Quality Sport Images/Getty Images)

It was a night to forget for Origi himself but more importantly for the squad as a whole. While Liverpool’s Champions League-winning hero didn’t cover himself in glory on his return to the Wanda Metropolitano Stadium, it fair to say he has earnt enough credit in the bank to warrant the odd off performance.

Have something to tell us about this article?